FOOD

D.C. Restaurant Experts Call Out the Most Exciting and Infuriating D.C. Food Trends of 2022

Written by parkingfinds

In keeping with Eater tradition, we asked a group of restaurant critics, journalists, bloggers and industry experts to share their thoughts on this year’s cuisine.their annual answer “Ear in Eater” The research will be revealed in several posts this month. Then answer the question. What are the most exciting or most infuriating local restaurant trends for 2022?

Tom Siessema, washington post Food critic: The most exciting thing is that the service is automatically added to your check. Stop calculating after dinner!Most frustrating thing: all the chaos other Fee attached to the invoice.

Anne Limpert, Washington faction Executive Food Editor and Critic: Infuriating: Some restaurants seem to have forgotten how to serve small plates, cramming everything you choose onto the table at once. Lesson learned: you have to order every time you go. Also, the not-so-subtle rush of diners during their meal. It felt like so many dinners were fast forwarded this year. Not that I wanted to sit around for three hours, but I don’t want to eat dessert in 45 minutes.

Jessica Sidman, Washington faction Food editor: Yes, there were trends this year, but was it exciting? The arrival of celebrity chefs en masse (again), the continuation of the espresso martini frenzy, the wave of food halls, the return of the speakeasy. So, service charges all over the place made everything very overpriced. I can’t say I’m excited.

I talk about a maddening trend. Mind you, I’m not really against QR code menus. they are good Anything is fine. TRUE. But I think in some places the QR codes stick to the table making them sticky and uncomfortable which makes the experience even worse.Or your phone doesn’t want to read them It’s as dark as I’ve been to at least two restaurants this year where he had spotty cell phone service. So I had to log into the Wi-Fi network with a password to access the menu. One of the locations had a very long and complicated password that I entered incorrectly too many times. I ended up borrowing a dining companion’s phone to read the menu. Why, why.

Tigerella’s Personal Bread Pizza at the Western Market Food Hall in Foggy Bottom
Tigerrella

Lori Gardner, i was there i ate it Blogger: As for the “exciting” trends, there have been plenty of openings this year, and for the most part, dining in the DC area seems to be thriving again. The suggested tips and other extra charges on top of the service charge confuse many diners.

anti way, decorated antey Blogger: I love seeing the “food hall” concept gaining popularity, and pop-ups like Hole in the Wall at Tonari and Casa Kantuta are always fun! I also appreciate that there is.

Rick Chessen, Rick Eats DC Blogger: Butterboards are infuriating, but not pervasive enough to be called a trend. I also don’t like the trend of plant-based veggies trying to mimic protein — for example, red beets that look like filet mignon, or slices of watermelon on top of rice pretending to be tuna nigiri. And while the trompe l’oeil may be fun at first, once you’ve taken a bite, your taste buds won’t be content with over-promising what’s to come.

Angie Duran women of wine Co-Founder and Director of Operations, Duo Group and Bottles Wine Garden: Do not order the “Negroni”. Suvariato. Prosecco from me and ”. But it’s really nice to see that the low alcohol content continues to grow and doesn’t slow down in the city. Being “mindful” has been pushed into every part of our lives these past few years. let me know.

Missy FrederickEater City Director: I’ve always been intrigued by nostalgic cocktail trends that Eater DC editor Tierney Plum has documented with great work, such as Blue Curacao, Mind Eraser, and Espresso Martini (I know this started earlier this year). I’m waiting. Grasshopper Cocktail riff Jane Give me back his Jane!Also pleased with the place serving Book It! .

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